How to setup the reactive Cloud Native Starter sample application on OpenShift in IBM Cloud

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 5 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In that short video I show the setup of the example application to show reactive programming.

The image below shows the major architecture of the reactive programming example. There are three Java Microservices, one Vue.js UI application and two infrastructure components running on OpenShift (Kubernetes).

reactive-architecture

 


I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

PS:  You can try out Cloud Foundry Apps or Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. By the way, you can use the IBM Cloud for free, if you simply create an IBM Lite account. Here you only need an e-mail address.

#IBMDeveloper, #IBMCloud, #OpenShift, #Kafka, #Postgres, #MicroProfile, #Java #reactive

 

 

Get started with GitBook and GitHub a small guide

In this blog post I want to point out the great documentation topic GitBook.

The first time I noticed GitBook, was in a hands-on workshop, when I asked the presenters how they create and update their good looking workshop documentation.

I directly tried out the free GitBook version  for one of my GitHub projects and I noticed the awesome navigation, search, feedback and the responsive webpage capabilities which is all provided out of the box by GitBook. That’s awesome.

Here is a small gif that shows the GitHub readme.md page and the GitBook page at the same time.

gitbook-page-and-github-page

Sure there are many more functionalities in GitBook such as teaming, but to use these functionalities you need a paid license and I didn’t tried that out.

Here is a small “get started guide” I created from my perspective to get started with a GitBook page.

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A small, but useful change in the IBM Cloud CLI for Kubernetes

This blog post is about a very small, but useful change in the IBM Cloud CLI for Kubernetes clusters.

You no longer need to export and set the KUBECONFIG environment variable to access your Kubernetes cluster on IBM Cloud in a terminal session. ( IBM Cloud documentation ).

You just can execute following IBM Cloud CLI command,

ibmcloud ks cluster config --cluster YOURCLUSTER

and verify the config settings.

kubectl config current-context

These images are showing the guides for your IBM Kubernetes cluster before and now.
Before Now
before now

That’s all.


I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

PS:  You can try out Cloud Foundry Apps or Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. By the way, you can use the IBM Cloud for free, if you simply create an IBM Lite account. Here you only need an e-mail address.

#IBMCloud, #Kubernetes

Run a Docker image as a Cloud Foundry App on IBM Cloud

In that blog post I want to point out an awesome topic: “Run a Docker container image as a Cloud Foundry App on IBM Cloud”

Rainer Hochecker, Simon Moser and I had an interesting exchange about running a Docker image as a Cloud Foundry App on IBM Cloud.

The advantage with that approach is: you don’t need to instantiate a Kubernetes or OpenShift cluster. You can just run a single Docker image with your single application on IBM Cloud. That can be useful in different situations where you need to control the contents of your application, and the cloud foundry build-pack mechanism maybe restricts you.

IBM offers to run Cloud Foundry Apps on IBM Cloud and supports a set of build packsBut, by the fact IBM uses Cloud Foundry, you can also upload a Docker image as a Cloud Foundry application, it’s an officially supported feature. Yes there is no documentation related to that topic in the IBM Cloud documentation, but you can apply the Cloud Foundry documentation.

One impact of that situation is, you don’t see the VCAP variables and you can’t use the out of the box binding for IBM Cloud services. You have to manage the bindings to your IBM Cloud services by yourself.  

Let’s start with a short guide: How to setup a Cloud Foundry application using a Docker image.

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