Using the internal OpenShift container registry to deploy an application

This cheat sheet is an extension to a blog post I made which is called: Configure a project in an IBM Cloud Red Hat OpenShift cluster to access the IBM Cloud Container Registry . In that related blog post we used the IBM Cloud Container registry to get the container images to run our example application. Now in this cheat sheet we will use the Red Hat OpenShift internal container registry and the Docker build strategy to deploy the same example application to OpenShift.

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Deploy a simple app using the OpenShift CLI

That blog post is a simple cheat sheet, how to deploy a containerized application to OpenShift. We using an existing container image on a public Quay Repository and the OpenShift CLI. This blog post is also a combination of existing blog posts to compare the automated created specifications to the predefined specifications in the blog post Configure a project in an IBM Cloud Red Hat OpenShift cluster to access the IBM Cloud Container Registry and use the login written in the blog post Log in to the an IBM Cloud Red Hat OpenShift cluster using the IBM Cloud and OpenShift CLI.

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Configure a project in an IBM Cloud Red Hat OpenShift cluster to access the IBM Cloud Container Registry

This cheat sheet is about, how to configure a project in an IBM Cloud Red Hat OpenShift to access the IBM Cloud Container Registry. We use an image pull secret to access container images from IBM Cloud Container Registries. The cheat sheet combines different steps, which are available in the IBM Cloud documentation you find here.

We configure a created project in OpenShift to access two different IBM Cloud Container Registries.

The IBM Cloud Red Hat OpenShift cluster is a part of IBM Cloud Account ONE.

The image below shows a simplified architecture overview:

Note: The cheat sheet references to source code, which is available in that example GitHub project. In case you want to follow the steps, you can clone the GitHub project to your local computer.

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Write your first simple Kubernetes Operator

Ask your human Operator to do all the complicated ugly work for you!

… or write your own Operator, if you are the expert and you know how the complicated ugly work, works in detail. This is how you can make sure it works in the future 😉

For those of you who don’t know Kubernetes Operators in combination with Ansible, let me just give you a very simplified description from my point of view:

Even a student with minimal knowledge of Kubernetes should be able to install a highly complex container-based application on top of Kubernetes or OpenShift. Eliminate the manual interaction effort as much as possible to deploy, run, and maintain your containerized application on Kubernetes or OpenShift with your Operator implementation.


During my search on the internet, how to build an own custom Kubernetes Operator, I came along to that awesome YouTube video with a talk from Keith Tenzer, he gave in 2020 on the Open Infrastructure Foundation Summit called “Building Kubernetes Operators with the Operator Framework and Ansible”.

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