Open the door for root users in Red Hat OpenShift (example StatefulSet)¶

This “blog post"/"cheat sheet” is about “Open the door for root users in OpenShift (example StatefulSet)”. The topic is in context of two blog posts I wrote called Run a PostgreSQL container as a non-root user in OpenShift and Open the door for root users in Red Hat OpenShift¶.

If you want to get an overview of the existing Default OpenShift security context constraints visit the IBM Cloud documentation.

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Open the door for root users in Red Hat OpenShift (example Deployment)¶

This “blog post"/"cheat sheet” is about “Open the door for root users in OpenShift“. The topic is in context of an older blog post I wrote called Run a PostgreSQL container as a non-root user in OpenShift. Let’s look for the opposite perspective in this blog post.

If you want to get an overview of the existing Default OpenShift security context constraints visit the IBM Cloud documentation.

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Automated creation of a Red Hat OpenShift cluster on IBM Cloud using the existing CLIs and plugins

This blog post is about automating the creation of a Red Hat OpenShift cluster on IBM Cloud in a Virtual Private Cloud. I used bash scripting with the IBM Cloud CLI and and the associated IBM Cloud CLI plugins vpc-infrastructure and kubernetes-service. I also use jq to handle json output.

I created the bash automation in combination of the IBM Cloud documentation and tutorials and my blog post about the automated setup of a simple Virtual Private Cloud.  It’s more about learning and not so much for production.

These are the three resources I used in the IBM Cloud documentation:

I’m not going to show every function of the bash script in this blog post. For details, please visit the script in the GitHub project.

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Create an edge route for an example application on a Red Hat OpenShift Cluster on IBM Cloud

This blog post is about an example usage of the awesome tutorial made by Masa Abushamleh at IBM Developer called Secure routes for your microservices on Red Hat OpenShift. I applied the content, with some small modifications, to my existing example application. It’s the same application I used in this blog post Using the internal OpenShift container registry to deploy an application.

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How to configure the IBM Cloud Operator for an existing Cloudant service?

Kubernetes Operators are an awesome way to simplify work for developers to setup and maintain complex applications in Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift.

The IBM Cloud Operator provides you the ability to bind IBM Cloud services to your applications running in Kubernetes or RedHat OpenShift and create, update, and delete IBM Cloud services from within the cluster by calling Kubernetes APIs, instead of needing to use several IBM Cloud APIs in addition to configuring your app for Kubernetes.

That example shows how to bind an existing Cloudant service instance in IBM Cloud to an application running in Red Hat OpenShift. The content of the example is related to the usage of the Red Hat OpenShift with IBM Cloud Open Labs. In these labs you can use a preconfigured OpenShift environment for four hours at no charge to run workshops by your own. By the way, here you can find the related source code for the examples.

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Write your first simple Kubernetes Operator

Ask your human Operator to do all the complicated ugly work for you!

… or write your own Operator, if you are the expert and you know how the complicated ugly work, works in detail. This is how you can make sure it works in the future 😉

For those of you who don’t know Kubernetes Operators in combination with Ansible, let me just give you a very simplified description from my point of view:

Even a student with minimal knowledge of Kubernetes should be able to install a highly complex container-based application on top of Kubernetes or OpenShift. Eliminate the manual interaction effort as much as possible to deploy, run, and maintain your containerized application on Kubernetes or OpenShift with your Operator implementation.


During my search on the internet, how to build an own custom Kubernetes Operator, I came along to that awesome YouTube video with a talk from Keith Tenzer, he gave in 2020 on the Open Infrastructure Foundation Summit called “Building Kubernetes Operators with the Operator Framework and Ansible”.

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