Get your Java Microservice up and running!

In this blog post I want to highlight the hands-on workshop “Get your Java Microservice up and running!“, now available in GitBook . That workshop demonstrates how to build a Microservice with Java and how to deploy the Microservice Kubernetes on the IBM Cloud. The Microservice in this workshop is kept as simple as possible, so that it can be used as a starting point for other Microservices. The Microservice has been developed with Java EE, OpenLiberty and Eclipse MicroProfile.

The workshop is a part of the open source project Cloud Native Starter, which contains sample code that demonstrates how to get started with cloud-native applications and Microservice based architectures.
The Workshop has a related badge called Cloud Native Starter Level 1. This badge is available at Acclaim. In the related quiz you can verify your knowledge you achieved in the workshop.

The gif below show some major steps in the hands-on workshop. You will develop locally a Java Microservice and deploy that Microservice to a free Kubernetes Cluster on IBM Cloud.

microservice docker java kubernetes deployment

I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

#microprofile, #java, #ibmcloud, #openliberty, #microservices, #kubernetes

Reactive programming is about messages, futures, events, channels and streams

In this blog post I want to point out the topic of the open sourced Reactive Cloud Native Starter example with Java backend Microservices and a Vue.js frontend web application. The gif below shows the example application. The application simply displays Articles and Authors information on a web page. You also see the creation of Articles with cURL commands in a terminal session and the UI is updated automatically.
(the gif is from the Cloud Native Starter project)

reactive demo
That example was mainly developed by Niklas Heidloff. He wrote a lot of very useful blog posts like Development of Reactive Applications with Quarkus related to that topic.

In this blog post I show, what could be useful to know, when you start with this Cloud Native Starter example for reactive programming to create and consume reactive RESTful APIs in an asynchronous way. I will also give a brief overview of the steps to create an article in the example application.

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Getting started to secure a simple Java Microservice with Keycloak, MicroProfile and OpenLiberty

Invoke reactive Endpoints with Quarkus and MicroProfile

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 15 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In this video you can watch and follow the steps of the exercise 3 “Invoke Endpoints reactively”. Niklas wrote a great blog post about the topic of that exercise. This is the name and link of his blog post Invoking REST APIs asynchronously with Quarkus.

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Develop reactive Endpoints with Quarkus

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 12 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In this video you can watch and follow the steps of the exercise 2 “Develop reactive Endpoints”. Niklas wrote a great blog post about the topic of that exercise. This is the name and link of his blog post Developing reactive REST APIs with Quarkus.

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How to setup the reactive Cloud Native Starter sample application on OpenShift in IBM Cloud

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 5 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In that short video I show the setup of the example application to show reactive programming.

The image below shows the major architecture of the reactive programming example. There are three Java Microservices, one Vue.js UI application and two infrastructure components running on OpenShift (Kubernetes).

reactive-architecture

 


I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

PS:  You can try out Cloud Foundry Apps or Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. By the way, you can use the IBM Cloud for free, if you simply create an IBM Lite account. Here you only need an e-mail address.

#IBMDeveloper, #IBMCloud, #OpenShift, #Kafka, #Postgres, #MicroProfile, #Java #reactive

 

 

Deploy the Reactive Cloud Native Starter example to IBM Cloud

The Cloud Native Starter project now contains the new great topic, the development of Reactive Microservices  with Java, quarkus, MicroProfile and Vue.js as front-end. The Reactive example implementation runs on minikube, local OpenShift and on IBM Cloud Kubernetes. Here are the instructions on GitHub.

But what does reactive mean? Here is an extract of the definition in  The Reactive Manifesto.

“Systems built as Reactive Systems are more flexible, loosely-coupled and scalable. This makes them easier to develop and amenable to change. They are significantly more tolerant of failure and when failure does occur they meet it with elegance rather than disaster. Reactive Systems are highly responsive, giving users effective interactive feedback.” 

But be aware, our example is not a full Reactive System it shows reactive programming techniques.

Note: To understand the difference between these two topics, that badge on cognitiveclass is useful Reactive Architecture: Introduction to Reactive Systems.

In our reactive programming example, you see directly changes in the database on the Web UI, without refreshing the browser.

reactive-sample

In this blog post I want to share, how you deploy that awesome Reactive example to a free IBM Cloud Kubernetes Cluster and using the free quota of the IBM Cloud Container Registry. We avoid for the setup that you have to use any paid IBM Cloud services, because you want just to see how the Reactive example works on IBM Cloud.
To create a free Cluster you need a feature code to create a Trial Account or you create a pay as you go account and you only use the free services of IBM Cloud.

That is the major architecture of the Reactive example. Three Java Microservices, one Vue UI application and two infrastructure components running on Kubernetes.

reactive-architecture

But what is reactive programming in more detail? If you want to get more details of the Reactive topic, just visit the blog post Development of Reactive Applications with Quarkus from Niklas Heidloff and if you want to explore the setup for local OpenShift take a look into the blog post Cloud Native Starter on Red Hat OpenShift 4 from Harald Uebele.

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How to deploy a container to the IBM Cloud Kubernetes service

I want to describe another way to run the  Highscores-Service of the #BlueCloudMirror game . In the game I use  IBM Cloud Foundry apps, now I want to explore IBM Cloud Kubernetes.

Note: The #BlueCloudMirror game we  @Niklas, @Harald and I made, is available as an Pattern on IBM Developer.

The first step was creating a container for the Highscores-Service,  which I described in my blog post how to build a container.

In this post I deploy my scores-service container to the IBM Cloud Kubernetes service.  This is  not a blueprint for IBM Kubernetes deployments, if you looking for a blueprint,  just take a look hereIBM Cloud documentation contains a great guide for getting started:  How to setup and use IBM Cloud Kubernetes

I share my experiences and observations with you, along with my deployment.

Let’s start with an overview of the topics I touch in this blog post:

Simplified Architecture 

kube-basic-architecture

The above picture shows a simplified architecture for the scores-service inside Kubernetes. You can see the relevant elements for the deployment. If you are interested in the details of  these elements, just click on the linked Kubernetes documentation.

The major elements:

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