Use of “Quarkus Security OpenID Connect Multi Tenancy” in an own small example

That blog post is about the usage of the “Quarkus Security OpenID Connect Multi Tenancy” implementation in an own small example, how to extract a tenant and reconfigure OIDC configuration for Keycloak.

This blog post is structured as followed:

  • Objectives
  • Use case definition
  • Architecture
  • Multi tenancy realization
  • Technologies
  • Implementation
  • Summary

You can find the code in the under construction GitHub project.

Basics understanding: “A tenant is a group of users who share a common access with specific privileges to the software instance. …” Wikipedia

Keep in mind there is no common single definition what exactly multi tenancy is in detail. One definition you can find in Wikipedia or one in the IBM learn hub, and many more exist.

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How to simply examine a JSON response from a Cloudant search in Java

This is a short cheat sheet about, how to simply examine a JSON response from a Cloudant search in Java. I found different examples, but these examples were (more or less) older examples, where I missed some pieces and at the end for me the Java EE documentation was the best resource to realize it.

The JSON I wanted to examine, was a JSON with a nested JSON array and that array also contains a nested JSON.

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Configure the attach debug for Quarkus in Visual Studio Code

This blog post is a short cheat sheet for:

  • How to simply organize workspaces and the debugging configuration separated from source code saved in GitHub.
  • How to simply configure attach debug for Quarkus in Visual Studio Code

The advantage with that organization is:

You can easily delete the source code saved in GitHub from your local machine, but you don’t lose the debugging or other configurations you did.

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Get your Java Microservice up and running!

In this blog post I want to highlight the hands-on workshop “Get your Java Microservice up and running!“, now available in GitBook . That workshop demonstrates how to build a Microservice with Java and how to deploy the Microservice Kubernetes on the IBM Cloud. The Microservice in this workshop is kept as simple as possible, so that it can be used as a starting point for other Microservices. The Microservice has been developed with Java EE, OpenLiberty and Eclipse MicroProfile.

The workshop is a part of the open source project Cloud Native Starter, which contains sample code that demonstrates how to get started with cloud-native applications and Microservice based architectures.
The Workshop has a related badge called Cloud Native Starter Level 1. This badge is available at Acclaim. In the related quiz you can verify your knowledge you achieved in the workshop.

The gif below show some major steps in the hands-on workshop. You will develop locally a Java Microservice and deploy that Microservice to a free Kubernetes Cluster on IBM Cloud.

microservice docker java kubernetes deployment

I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

#microprofile, #java, #ibmcloud, #openliberty, #microservices, #kubernetes

Getting started to secure a simple Java Microservice with Keycloak, MicroProfile and OpenLiberty

Invoke reactive Endpoints with Quarkus and MicroProfile

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 15 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In this video you can watch and follow the steps of the exercise 3 “Invoke Endpoints reactively”. Niklas wrote a great blog post about the topic of that exercise. This is the name and link of his blog post Invoking REST APIs asynchronously with Quarkus.

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Develop reactive Endpoints with Quarkus

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 12 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In this video you can watch and follow the steps of the exercise 2 “Develop reactive Endpoints”. Niklas wrote a great blog post about the topic of that exercise. This is the name and link of his blog post Developing reactive REST APIs with Quarkus.

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