Getting started with continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) using Tekton and an Open Toolchain on IBM Cloud (Part 3/3)

This blog post is about the last 14 min video for my YouTube playlist related to the hands-on tutorial “Develop a Kubernetes app by using Tekton delivery pipelines“. In this video we do the final setup of the toolchain and then we execute a Tekton pipeline. For more background please visit my first blog post “Getting started with continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) using Tekton and an Open Toolchain on IBM Cloud (Part 1/3)“.

Note: The video was live recorded and it would take 30 min for the entire session, but I did reduce the time of the video to only 14 min ;-).

But now the video could be sometimes a little bit (too) fast.

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Getting started with continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) using Tekton and an Open Toolchain on IBM Cloud (Part 2/3)

This blog post is about my newly created 9 min YouTube video about the setup of the prerequisites for the hands-on tutorial “Develop a Kubernetes app by using Tekton delivery pipelines“. That video is a part of the video series for the tutorial. For more details please visit my last blog post “Getting started with continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) using Tekton and an Open Toolchain on IBM Cloud (Part 1/3)

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Invoke reactive Endpoints with Quarkus and MicroProfile

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 15 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In this video you can watch and follow the steps of the exercise 3 “Invoke Endpoints reactively”. Niklas wrote a great blog post about the topic of that exercise. This is the name and link of his blog post Invoking REST APIs asynchronously with Quarkus.

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Develop reactive Endpoints with Quarkus

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 12 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In this video you can watch and follow the steps of the exercise 2 “Develop reactive Endpoints”. Niklas wrote a great blog post about the topic of that exercise. This is the name and link of his blog post Developing reactive REST APIs with Quarkus.

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How to setup the reactive Cloud Native Starter sample application on OpenShift in IBM Cloud

In this blog post I want to point out that I just created a 5 min YouTube video related to the great Hands-on workshop: Reactive Endpoints with Quarkus on OpenShift. In that short video I show the setup of the example application to show reactive programming.

The image below shows the major architecture of the reactive programming example. There are three Java Microservices, one Vue.js UI application and two infrastructure components running on OpenShift (Kubernetes).

reactive-architecture

 


I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

PS:  You can try out Cloud Foundry Apps or Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. By the way, you can use the IBM Cloud for free, if you simply create an IBM Lite account. Here you only need an e-mail address.

#IBMDeveloper, #IBMCloud, #OpenShift, #Kafka, #Postgres, #MicroProfile, #Java #reactive

 

 

A small, but useful change in the IBM Cloud CLI for Kubernetes

This blog post is about a very small, but useful change in the IBM Cloud CLI for Kubernetes clusters.

You no longer need to export and set the KUBECONFIG environment variable to access your Kubernetes cluster on IBM Cloud in a terminal session. ( IBM Cloud documentation ).

You just can execute following IBM Cloud CLI command,

ibmcloud ks cluster config --cluster YOURCLUSTER

and verify the config settings.

kubectl config current-context

These images are showing the guides for your IBM Kubernetes cluster before and now.
Before Now
before now

That’s all.


I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

PS:  You can try out Cloud Foundry Apps or Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. By the way, you can use the IBM Cloud for free, if you simply create an IBM Lite account. Here you only need an e-mail address.

#IBMCloud, #Kubernetes

error: no matches forkind “Deployment”in version “apps/v1beta1”

This is a short blog post about changes in the new Kubernetes deployment definition.
In my older blog posts related to Kubernetes you will find older deployment definitions, these definitions will cause errors during the Kubernetes deployment. Here are the two major problems you maybe will notice:

1. If you get the following error

error: unable to recognize "deployment.yaml": 
no matches forkind "Deployment"in version "apps/v1beta1"
Please change the entry apps/v1beta1 to apps/v1 in the deployment.yaml file, the newer `deployment definition` for Kubernetes v1.16.8 (v1.18).

Note: Additional useful blog post here.


2. If you get this error

error: error validating "deployment.yaml": 
error validating data: ValidationError(Deployment.spec): 
missing required field "selector"in io.k8s.api.apps.v1.DeploymentSpec; 
#if you choose to ignore these errors, 
turn validation off with --validate=false
You need to insert in the deployment specification the statement selector:matchLabels:name:authors, as you see in the table below.
The table contains an example of the major changes in the deployment specification, the left hand side contains the new Kubernetes deployment definition and right hand side includes the older definition. The `selector` is now required.

kind: Deployment
apiVersion: apps/v1
metadata:
   name: authors
   labels:
     app: authors
spec:
   selector:
     matchLabels:
       app: authors
       version: v1
  replicas: 1
  template:
    metadata:
     labels:
        app: authors
        version: v1
     spec:
       containers:
       - name: authors
         image: authors:1
         ports:
          - containerPort: 3000
 ...
kind: Deployment
apiVersion: apps/v1beta1
metadata:
  name: authors
  labels:
    app: authors
spec: 
  ...
  ...
  ...
  ...
  replicas: 1
  template:
  metadata:
    labels:
      app: authors
        version: v1
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: authors
        image: authors:1
        ports:
        - containerPort: 3000
...

I hope this was useful for you and let’s see what’s next?

Greetings,

Thomas

PS:  You can try out Cloud Foundry Apps or Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. By the way, you can use the IBM Cloud for free, if you simply create an IBM Lite account. Here you only need an e-mail address.

#Kubernetes, #Deployment, #yaml

 

Automated deployment of a microservice to Kubernetes on IBM Cloud

In that blog post I want to point out the awesome topic, how to automate the deployment of a Microservice using a delivery pipeline on IBM Cloud.

Maybe you already know Niklas, Harald and I made the great project called Cloud Native Starter. That project includes a Hands-on workshop that is called “Build a Java Microservice and deploy the Microservice to Kubernetes on IBM Cloud”.  In Lab 4 you have to deploy the Authors Microservice to Kubernetes on IBM Cloud. Sometimes we have limited time in workshops. The limited time is the reason why we want to reduce the manual effort for students in a workshop to a minimum, therefor we took the IBM® Cloud Continuous Delivery and I created a repeatable way with minimal human interaction. The delivery pipeline contains sequences of stages which retrieve inputs and run jobs, such as builds, and deployments.

That image shows two stages, one stage is called FETCH and the other DEPLOY_SERVICES. The FETCH stages contains a job called Fetch code and the DELOY_SERVICES has two jobs one for build and one for deployment.

Toolchain-04

With the realization of the automated setup for the creation of the toolchain, you can just press the button Create toolchain in the GitHub project and follow a guided wizard to deploy the Authors Microservice.

Visit the hands-on workshop Use a IBM Cloud toolchain to deploy a Java Microservices to Kubernetes on IBM Cloud and press the button 😉

create-toolchain-gitbook

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